Skill 9 Adjective Clause Connector

In Skill 9 we saw that adjective clause connectors can be used to introduce clauses that describe nouns.

In the first example, there are two clauses: we is the subject of the verb are looking, and that is the subject of the verb is. These two clauses are joined with the connector that. Notice that in this example the word that serves two functions at the same time: it is the subject of the verb is, and it is the connector that joins the two clauses. The adjective clause that is quite expensive describes the noun house.

 

In the second example, there are also two clauses: house is the subject of the verb seems, and that is the subject of the verb is. In this example, that also serves two functions: it is the subject of the verb is, and it is the connector that joins the two clauses. Because that is quite expensive is an adjective clause describing the noun house, it directly follows house.

 

The following example shows how these sentence patterns could be tested in the Structure section of the TOEFL test.

Example

______ just dropped off a package for you is my sister.

(A) The woman
(B) The woman who
(C) Because the woman
(D) With the woman

 

In this example, you should notice immediately that the sentence has two verbs, dropped and is, and each of them needs a subject. The only answer that has two subjects is answer (B), so answer (B) is the correct answer. The correct sentence should say: The woman who just dropped off a package for you is my sister. In this sentence woman is the subject of the verb is, and who is the subject of the verb dropped. Who is also the connector that joins the two clauses?
The following chart lists the adjective clause connector/subjects and the sentence patterns used with them.

 

 

An adjective clause describes a noun. Because the clause is an adjective, it is positioned directly after the noun that it describes.

 

In the first example, there are two clauses: this is the subject of the verb is, and I is the subject of the verb want. That is the adjective clause connector that joins these two clauses, and the adjective clause that I want to buy describes the noun house.

 

In the second example, there are also two clauses: house is the subject of the verb is, and I is the subject of the verb want. In this sentence also, that is the adjective clause connector that joins these two clauses, and the adjective clause that I want to buy describes the noun house.

 

The following example shows how these sentence patterns could be tested in the Structure section of the TOEFL test.
Example

The job _____ started yesterday was rather difficult.
(A) when
(B) was
(C) after
(D) that he

In this example, you should notice quickly that there are two clauses: job is the subject of the verb was, and the verb started needs a subject. Because there are two clauses, a connector is also needed. Answers (A) and (C) have connectors, but there are no subjects, so these answers are not correct. Answer (B) changes started into a passive verb; in this case the sentence would have one subject and two verbs, so answer (B) is not correct. The best answer to this question is answer (D). The correct sentence should say: The job that he started yesterday was rather difficult. In this sentence job is the subject of the verb was, he is the subject of the verb started, and the connector that joins these two clauses.

The following chart lists the adjective clause connectors and the sentence pat terns used with them.

EXERCISE skill 9:

Each of the following sentences contains more than one clause. Underline the subjects once and the verbs twice. Circle the connectors. Then indicate if the sentences are correct (C) or incorrect (I).
1. I did not believe the story that he told me. (C)

   Analysis:

First Clause                            : I did not believe the story
Second Clause                       : He told me
Adjective clause connector     : that

2. Ms. Brown, whom did you recommend for the job, will start work tomorrow.(I)

    Analysis:

First clause                         : Ms. Brown will start work tomorrow
Second clause                    : Did you recommend for the job (incorrect)
It should be you recommended for the job
Adjective clause connector : whom

The correct sentence is Ms. Brown, who you recommended for the job, will start work tomorrow.

3. The lecture notes which lent me were not clearly written.(I)

Analysis:

First clause                       : The lecture notes were not clearly written
Second clause                  :  lent me (incorrect)
It should be I lent
Adjective clause connector : which

The correct sentence is the lecture notes which I lent were not clearly written

4. Sally has an appointment with the hairdresser whom you recommended. (C)

Analysis:

First clause                         : Sally has an appointment with the hairdresser
Second clause                    : you recommended
Adjective clause connector : whom

5. The phone number that you gave me.

Analysis:

First clause                        : The phone number (incorrect: no verb)
Second clause                   : you gave me
Adjective clause connector : that
The correct sentence is The phone number that you gave me IS wrong

6. She is able to solve all the problems which did she cause.(I)

Analysis:

First clause                       : She is able to solve the problems
Second clause                  : did she cause (incorrect)
It should be she caused
Adjective clause connector: She is able to solve all the problems which she caused

7. The day that she spent on the beach left her sunburned. (C)

Analysis:

First clause                         : The day left her sunburned
Second clause                     :  she spend on the beach
Adjective clause connector :  that

8. Next week I am going to visit my cousins, whom have not seen in several years.(I)

Analysis:

First clause                           : Next week I am going to visit my cousins
Second clause                      :  have not seen in several years (incorrect)
It should be I have not seen in several years
Adjective clause connector   : whom
The correct sentence is Next week I am going to visit my cousins, whom i have not seen in several years

9. Did you forget the promise whom you made? (C)

Analysis:

First clause                            : Did you forget the promise
second clause                        : you made?
Adjective clause connector    : whom

10. The teacher whom the students like the most is their history teacher.

Analysis:

First clause                             : The teacher is their history teacher
Second clause                        :  the students like the most
Adjective clause connector     :  whom

sumber :

Philips, Deborah. Longman Complete Course For TOEFL. 2001. New York. Longman.

 

http://www.toeflskill.com/2011/02/adjective-clause-connector-toefl-skill.html

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